0319

A virtual gallery space.

Current Time



︎︎︎ Info
︎︎︎ Writing



︎︎︎ Email
︎︎︎ Instagram
︎︎︎ Newsletter




























0319


A virtual gallery space.



︎︎︎ Email
︎︎︎ Instagram
︎︎︎ Newsletter



︎︎︎ Info
︎︎︎ Writing


PHYSICAL PHOTOGRAPH
02 PP



PA2200 nylon
acrylic cube

2017
A tangible photograph for the visually impaired.

The work is interpreted through careful studies of the principles of Japanese architecture and the simultaneous juxtaposition of the brutalist Barbican.

My approach was to challenge the standard ideas what a photograph physically is or should look like. Paper and its characteristics are widely used by Japanese architects both of traditional and of modern practice. However, more importantly it is used in the medium of photography where it is coated in light sensitive chemicals to capture light. To challenge the conventional ways of printing and presenting photographs I have conducted research through reconsidering the ways how photographs can be manifested into real life. Instead of a two dimensional image, I chose to experiment with materials, textures and - just like the features of paper - the idea of weightlessness. What is it like to hold a photograph and experience the tactility and depth of different shadows and hues. The inclusion of materials contextualises the work in space and time to allow not just a merely visual, but a visual and sensorial depiction of the captured subject. These produced photographs mediate between technology, nature and everyday life suggesting new ways of thinking about materials used in the photographic printing process.

In order to achieve such effect, I have used computer aided design softwares to manipulate my photographs creating a bitmap and a relief surface which then extruded to create an object composed of over 10000 polygons, that is then 3D printed with selective laser synthering. To re-display the printing process, the photograph was presented in a transparent cube filled with PA2200 nylon - the same material that forms the photograph - to signify the moment of excavation of the artefact. Utilisng analogue methods, I was able to both shape the images physically in the darkroom and digitally on the computer.







© 2023 Barbara Bazso